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>>> cooperative competitors. russia's president meets with his chinese counterpart to talk about how their countries can both benefit from stronger ties. welcome to nhk world "newsline." vladimir putin is welcoming world leaders to russia's far east ahead of this weekend's apec summit. he's given a special greeting to china's president hu jintao by meeting with him first. hu is the first leader putin met in vladivostok, their countries share a border 4,000 kilometers. earlier, i spoke with nhk world's kaori nagao who is in vladivostok covering the apec meetings. >> reporter: the leaders covered a wide range of matters from economics to international relations. >> reporter: at the top the agenda was economic relations. they agreed not only to increase mutual trade and investment, but also to enhance the cooperation in areas such as energy and high-tech development. after the meeting, president putin made a keynote speech at apec's business forum. the three-day business forum is being held alongside apec sessions. businesspeople from 500 leading pacific rim companies attended frida
. >> kaori, russia seems to be placing special emphasis on its far east which borders china's northeast. as you reported earlier, russia has spent around $21 billion in infrastructure projects there over the past five years. >> reporter: that's right. businesspeople are closely watching what russia will do next. one-third of the people, the companies, attending the forum were chinese. i asked several chinese attendees what they think about the economic relation with russia. >> so coming here as a chinese businessman, you know, to learn more and also to find opportunities to work together. and i think that's, you know, china has a lot to offer for russia and so does russia. >> russia, we are a close country. the far east is -- it has a big potential. >> chinese business leaders are expecting that russia's development in its far eastern borderlands will benefit their activities. what about china's government? >> reporter: hu jintao wants to strengthen economic relations with russia. china's economy is slowing down due to europe's credit crisis. russia's far east has great potential, both
with the benefits they get for their membership in the w.t.o. there was a lot of negotiation and talk about russia's entry into the world trade organization. the idea of seeing russia forced to comply with a system that would prevent them from engaging in discriminatory practices, from engaging in the kinds of acts that prevent products and services from getting into their country, the structure of having to comply with a rule he was based system, is something that membership in the w.t.o. forces and creates. and again, there were a lot of gos. the last was dealing with a border dispute with georgia that was resolved and that was resolved several months ago and that put into place a structure that allowed on august 22, last month, for russia to enter the world trade organization. russia is part of the w.t.o. they are now having been for over three weeks a member of the world trade organization. that means, as i said, tremendous benefits, that russia gets. they have 140 million consumers. there are going to be opportunities for countries around the world to export into russia. we last year exported
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight a conversation about russia and its foreign policy with the foreign minister, sergey lavrov. do you think you are on the wrong side of history. >> you can only judge when history evolves and we are now watching history in the making. when my good friend colin powell. >> rose: colin powell. >> was shaking this vial with some white powder in the security council, the americans were telling us unless we authorize the use of force against iraq, we would be on the wrong part of history. and it turns out to be that there was no anthrax in that file. >> rose: okay. a program note the prime minister mario monti was scheduled to be on our program, he will be on our program tomorrow night. tonight the prime minister of russia. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: sergey lavrov is here, he has served as russia's foreign minister since 204. he is in new york for the united nations general assembly. the conflict in syria is an essential focus. president obama spoke about t
ministers from 21 economies are meeting in vladivostok in russia's far east. they've agreed to reduce tariffs on a host of environment-related products. nhk world has the latest from vladivostok and in an in-depth look at how russia is expanding its footprint in the asia-pacific region. >> reporter: they've released a communique after the second day of talks. they have agreed to reduce tariffs on 54 environment-related products, not only solar panels but wind-powered technology and machines that convert waste into energy. the discussions on this topic took more time than expected. china's delegates initially opposed the agreement over fears the import of solar panels from abroad could hinder their domestic industry. ministers also agreed to combat trade protectionism. they say low economic growth means it's even more urgent to keep markets open. russian leaders trying to use the apec summit as an opportunity to show their economic focus is now on asia. the country's reserves of natural gas and crude oil amongst the largest in the world. nhk's vladivostok bureau chief yuseki tamara sho
to be on our program, he will be on our program tomorrow night. tonight the prime minister of russia. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: sergey lavrov is here, he has served as russia's foreign minister since 204. he is in new york for the united nations general assembly. the conflict in syria is an essential focus. president obama spoke about the issue earlier today. >> in syria, the future must not belong to a dictator who massacres his people. if there's a cause that cries out for protest in the world today, peaceful protest. in a regime that tortures children and shoots rockets at apartment buildings. we must remain engaged to assure that what began with citizens demanding the rights does not end in the cycle of sectarian violence. together we must stand with those syrians who believe in a different vision, a syria that is united and inclusive where children don't need to fear their own government. and they have a say, sunni's and christians. that's what america stands for, that's what we will stand for
with the response. next the response of russia's judicial system and the future with the eu members of the european parliament passed a resolution commending russia's judicial system. this is 35 minutes. >> during the last exchange we had we shared our concerns and about the violence against demonstrators. we welcomed at the same time the russian civil society, and we saw the russian civil society ready to engage in battle with the government and to play an active role in the development of political institutions with the country. we sought dialogue between government and citizens. we have encouraged vladimir putin to pursue economic reform. we also offered our support in the shared organization's agenda. there have been some important developments. let me mention who world trade organization on the 22nd of august. russia took a major step forward in ongoing integration. we strongly support of that process and expect russia to fully implement all of the related agreements and to reach maximum benefit of the world trade organization. there has been some encouraging initial results to further institu
basically it's really easy to explain what's happening in russia to a four-year-old kid, and this is how she understands what's happening to her mom and what's happening to russia. she thinks that putin, as the evil hero, has locked up nadia in a castle in a cage and we have to fight to defeat this evil prince and get her out. >> i'm always surprised to hear how strong you sound when talking about your wife and the two other members. do you ever have bad days about this, and when you think about how long two years could be without seeing much of your wife. >> imagine not seeing the person who you love, the person who is very close to you not only personally but also professionally for two years. it's an amazing -- it's a very big period of time, and, well, the quiet moments obviously give you very hard feelings. >> what do you think will happen? i know you're ready for the worst, but do you think your wife and other members will get out before the two years on this appeal? >> so, yes, we do not have any hopes that the appeal will do any good, na it withat it will significantly rechange the r
the apec summit over the next five days. we'll also be taking a closer look at russia's asia-pacific strategy. nhk world's kaori nagao spoke to us earlier from vladivostok. >> reporter: hello, gene. the meeting happening here on russky island. what you see behind me is the bridge that spans the eastern bosphorous strait and connects here and also central vladivostok. apec foreign and trade ministers have started talks on wednesday. they discussed how to stabilize the food supply in the face of a global surge in grain prices. they agree to refrain from export controls and other protectionist measures. the ministers talked about apec's plan to lower tariffs on fast growing environmental related products to less than 5% by 2015. however, they couldn't agree on which products should get tariffs cuts. they'll continue that discussion on thursday. russian leaders began pushing to hold the summit here in vladivostok after joining the group in 1998. the city is the country's main gateway to markets in the asia-pacific region. and i had a look around vladivostok to see how it changed
in libya, there have been threats by russia toward escalation toward thermonuclear conflict. how does the iran situation fit in? why is martin dempsey coming out and oppose informal administration policy? are we pushing toward thermonuclear conflict with russia? how we avoid that? understand the question. >> let's move on then to the gentleman here. thank you. >> for those of us who have followed this whole issue, that was a brilliant presentation. this is an important question -- is a rent aware that obama cannot make a deal before the election? the white house knows that any deal would require some movement on the sanctions, as you pointed out, and israel and mitt romney would dump all over that and create an issue. is iran aware that obama will have more opportunity if he is reelected to make a deal along allies of istanbul which are very close to an agreement? >> yes, i do believe the iranians are aware. that no significant movement on the key issues they're interested in such as sanctions released as soon as possible in an election year. the problem is they are so suspicious and
and the heartland of europe towards russia on the other. it was always problematic which way it could go, how it would develop. now, i came across this book by accident in early 1989. early 1989. the berlin wall would fall that november, and i had been back and forth to east germany, and it occurred to me, after reading this book and other books, that the berlin wall or the dividing line between eastern and western germany was nearly one part of german history. that germany would have different -- would reinvent itself in different territorial ways in the future. so, today we have a united germany that trades immensely with pole -- poland. that where the european union and nato were meant to keep russia out and the germans down, now the germans are triumphant economically in lure. germany may not have all the solutions but berlin is the point of arbitration for all of them. so the question really arises -- and this gets back. >> host: ography -- with russia still needing buffer zones in eastern europe -- remember, the collapse of the warsaw pact did not end russia's insecurity facing west. it
with the fukushima accident. russia will take charge of developing nuclear fuel rods and collecting spent ones. the plant will operate under the atomic agency. iran says it will build more nuclear plabts and more nuclear technologies. that's nuclear power technologies. the united states, european nations and israel are weary that iran will speed up its enrichment activities to develop nuclear weapons. >>> voters in angola have griffin them another party in office. certain to win a majority in parliamentary elections. provisional results show that the popular movement for the liberation of angola have secured 75% of friday's vote. he has governed the country since 1979. the lead e forer of the party becomes president. the election win will extend the incumbent's rule by five years. angola is one of africa's leading oil producers. the country has seen an economic boom since a war ended ten years ago. >>> russia has revealed a tax on imported vehicles. joined the world trade organization and reduced import duties. the new tax is charged as a vehicle kal disposal fee. it's about $600 for a passeng
the weekend in vladivostok, russia. they are expected to approve initiatives toward integrating the region's economies. they'll focus on liberalizing trade and investment. the leaders are expected to agree not to restrict food exports. extreme weather has affected crops worldwide, and that's driving up prices. they'll promote agricultural investments in an effort to improve productivity. the leaders are expected to examine regional supply chains, too. the earthquake and tsunami last year in northern japan and flooding in thailand disrupted production in a number o industries. apec leaders are expected to include all of these efforts in a joint declaration at the end of their meetings on sunday. >>> japanese prime minister yoshihiko noda will meet with russian president vladimir putin on the sidelines of this summit. noda and putin are expected to discuss economic cooperation. and noda plans to raise the issue of russian-held islands claimed by japan. noda is also expected to promote cooperation in energy and other fields. he says he hopes this might lead to talks on the territor
states says it is closing down its aid mission in russia at the request of the russian government. they said they feared that non- government aid organizations are inciting the anti-government rallies. the watchdog that oversaw recent russian elections said that this departure of u.s. aid is a worrying development. >> there is a feeling amongst officials that these organizations are being used to foment anti-government feeling on the streets of russia. vladimir putin has not hit his conviction that the protests we have seen over the last few months have been inspired and funded by the u.s. government. it comes as no surprise, really, that moscow has taken this decision. it is a significant step. although the have been critical of the u.s. state department and u.s. aid programs before, it is one thing to criticize and another thing to close down. it is a significant step. >> have we seen any response from the u.s. or the aid groups themselves? >> the u.s. government says that although the aid mission will no longer have a physical presence in russia, it will continue to support dem
that russia is our number one geopolitical foe. sarah palin said she could see russia from alaska. mitt romney talks like he's only seen russia by watching "rocky iv." >> former presidential nominee john kerry was not considered a head liner speech going into the convention last week, but the personality that he unveiled there and how aggressive he was against mitt romney really turned him into a top tier headliner. while it was fun to watch the other headliners wander off script and ad lib in their speeches, president obama usually sticks very closely to his prepared remarks. interestingly though, the night of the obama speech, one of the few times president obama ad libbed off his script at all was when he went after mitt romney on that same russia thing that john kerry had just killed him on. >> you don't call russia our number one enemy, not al qaeda, russia, unless you're still stuck in a cold war mind war. >> mitt romney did, in fact, call russia our number one geopolitical foe. he said that in march of this year. in the 2000s. >> this is to russia. this is without question our number on
of having his own nuclear plant. it is also in russia's interest to build it as soon as possible. >> the world has been turning away from nuclear energy. clients for russia's nlear ports are dwindling. our leaders -- our leader's manic desire to own a nuclear plant makes us an ideal match. we are a testing site for a reactor that has never been built anywhere else. >> the next day, we e manage to get a meeting at the construction site. two reactors are to be built here with the combined capacity of 2,400 megawatts. the pit is finished, and concrete is already being poured, but environmental activists say there is not even a final blueprint y. the plant spokesman says the work so far is just preparatory and that nothing will be built without a blueprint. but he does confirm that there is, as of yet, no model of the reactor. critics, he says, are everywhere. >> some organizations are starting to actively resist the power plant. they want to put forward their views and say they represent popular opinion, but they are not succeeding. they are not sure why not. >> our next interview p
'm going to start this off by saying, this isn't the first time something like this has happened in russia. >> they got some guys driving down the roadway. got the dashcam on, and you know something's going to happen. because in russia as we've learn and "right this minute" over the past year, something always happens on the road in russia. the car is passing -- >> oh, geez. >> that's like -- >> high up in the air nap could have clipped the top of a van. >> look at it again. they're going around the car. >> and then that happens. >> yeah. i men that helicopter was trying to pass, too. >> yeah. that helicopters hot-dogging. that's the pilot we use right on the river level, and we twist and turn, well, they're trying to figure out if the military was conducting some kind of operation or some kind of training. all they know is, it was pretty low to the ground, and this isn't the first time it's happened. like i said, just recently, there was a jet that was flying over a roadway in russia. >> for videos like these that we often thank russia, and we're keeping the phrase hot-dogging alive, aliv
. brian mooar, nbc news, washington. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is in russia this weekend for the annual asia-pacific economic cooperation summit. clinton met with russia's president today congratulating him on russia's entry into the world trade organization. >> we believe this is good for russia. it's good for the united states. it's good for the global economy. three successive u.s. administrations worked steadily to advance russia's wto aspirations. we strongly support the basic bargain at the heart of the wto. >> she went on to say the obama administration would work closely with congress to lift cold war-era trade sanctions on russia so u.s. businesses could benefit from russia's new wto membership. the 1974 amendment restricted trade with the soviet union over its human rights record. clinton also met with japan's prime minister today. >>> in afghanistan a suicide bomber detonated explosives near the nato headquarters in kabul today and six people were reportedly killed. nbc's atia abawi has the latest. >> reporter: it's an area where isaf and the u.s. embassy and c
to russia and there is an intriguing tale of what happened then. >> we hire a young lawyer, named sergei, he was 36 years old, he worked for this american law firm and he was the smartest guy i new in, knew in upon moscow he was a lawyer that could run ciles around everyone else, you call at 10:00 o'clock at night, 1:00 o'clock at moscow and figure it out by the time you got to the office in the morning there would be a memo in the in-box, he was the most reliable guy we knew, sergei help us figure this whole thing out. and sergei goes out and investigates and says the situation is far worse than you can imagine. not only have the police been involved in stealing your companies, but they created a billion dollars of fake contracts that claim your companies owe a billion dollars to some three empty shell companies. we said, my god, that is terrible. he said it gets worse. >> rose: dick costolo of twitter and bill browder when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >> additional funding if provided by these funders. >> additional funding is provided by these funde
to refine. it goes to refineries all over the world, sold on the open market. most of it goes through russia, sold on the open market. it is found in gasoline products that you use in the united states, europe. >> how does it feel to be a person from texas heading up this huge operation here in kazakhstan? >> it is a tremendous honor for me to be here. my wife and i have enjoyed our time here tremendously. we have more than 3000 employees that we cherish and love dearly, as my own children. 85% are kazakhstan citizens now. the supervisors and managers are context and citizens as well. we have done very well over our 18-year history and we will do that going forward as well. it is a tremendous honor to lead this organization. >> oil and gas sector and occupies 26%. >> what percentage of oil and natural gas stays within kazakhstan for use here? what% is exported? >> the annual volume of oil production is about 81 million tons. out of that, 13.5 million intended for internal use in kazakhstan. otherwise, it is exported. >> what countries are the target of the exports? >> the most part is the eu
the reason american money to influence russia elections. >> u.s. government agency has supported activists and human rights groups with more than $2.7 billion since 1991. and out until october 1 to leave russia. -- they now have until october 1 to leave russia. >> usa i.t. has been in russia since the end of the soviet union, but now they have been ordered out by the russian interior minister. officials accused usaid workers of meddling in politics. >> this is about the fact that america wants to use development funds to influence russian politics and in -- and exert influence on elections. >> thousands of russians hit the street again and again to protest against vladimir putin. they accuse him of corruption and electoral fraud. observers uncovered irregularities during the parliamentary and presidential polls last winter. those observers were from a group funded by usaid. there are regional elections soon and that's the reason, they say, usaid has been kicked out. >> the state likes to mobilize nationalist voters just before elections. that works best when there is a foreign enemy and th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,297 (some duplicates have been removed)